macOS Sierra has gone into beta; but my Mac won’t run it!

So Apple have released several versions public betas for the next version of macOS – Sierra (10.12). With this release, the first since mountain lion 10.8, Apple have introduced new limits to the hardware capable of running it meaning that most Macs made before 2010 will not run it.

So; what does this mean for owners of these “orphaned” Macs?

Not much really – we are starting to see some older versions of the OS’s loose support for modern browsers (10.6 and 10.7) especially some popular sites like iPlayer, Netflix, facebook and twitter (and strangely often reported thetrainline.com). Even Chrome which has valiantly keep supporting older versions of Mac OS X has stopped supporting below 10.8 with new updates.

This means that now is the best time to get your older Mac up to date, and leave it running “as is” to give it the best chance of still being usable in years to come. Here is a quick list of must dos to make this happen.

1) “Get” Mac OS X 10.11 (El Capitain) from the Mac App Store – with previous releases as soon as the newest is out you can no longer purchase the last one so make sure it is on your Apple ID before it goes (once it is gone you can always re-download from the “purchased tab”).

2) Check how much RAM you have – we recommend at least 6GB to run El Capitain.

3) Make sure you have a working backup. Upgrading the OS should not cause any issues, but if you don’t have a backup and something does go wrong you could loose all your data. – see our Tips and tricks for a Major OS Upgrade for some details on this.

4) Check your hard drive before upgrading. – We recommend two applications which can test your have drive: It is worth running these before upgrading the OS.

i) BlackMagic Disk Speed Test: this tests the speed of your hard drive for use with digital video – very useful as failing hard drives often slow down. Expect a normal working HDD to give 70-100 MB/s – failing hard drives between 10-30 MB/s. If these readings have a high range (i.e. 1st is 90MB/s and then 30MB/s) that can also be a issue.

ii) SoftRAID: This is a great tool for creating an array of disks into a volume for speed or data redundancy. It also reads the extended SMART info which can be a helpful indicator of a failing hard drive.

5) Make sure you have enough time to be without your Mac – if something goes wrong it may take a few days to get back up from your backup or replace failed hardware – not worth doing if you have a major project due in next week!

 

In summary; now is the time to get these 2008-2010 Macs up to date and current to make sure that they are still useful machines for years to come.